Massive Small Collaborators

  • Kelvin Campbell
    Kelvin Campbell
    Founder / Writer - London, UK
  • Rob Cowan
    Rob Cowan
    Editor - London, UK
  • Andrew Campbell
    Andrew Campbell
    Executive Director, Massive Small Collective
  • Lauren Hermanus
    Lauren Hermanus
    Strategic Director, Massive Small Collective
  • Dan Dubowitz
    Dan Dubowitz
    Creative Director - London, UK
Kelvin Campbell
Founder / Writer - London, UK

Kelvin is a collaborative urbanist and writer. He chairs Smart Urbanism, the organisation he established in 2009, after founding and leading Urban Initiatives, a successful urban design practice, for over two decades. He is the author of Massive Small: the operating system for smart urbanism. He was visiting professor in urban design at the University of Westminster and chairman of the Urban Design Group. He is now honorary professor at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at the Bartlett, University College London. In 2013 Kelvin received the Urban Design Group’s Lifetime Achievement Award for his contribution to the profession. Later that year he was awarded the Built Environment Fellowship by the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851. Kelvin’s philosophy has been shaped by his early experience in informal settlements, and shaped by his practical experience in the planning, design and delivery of major urban regeneration and development projects in cities and towns worldwide.

Rob Cowan
Editor - London, UK

Rob is an urbanist and writer, and director of the consultancy UDS. He is editor of Context, the journal of the Institute of Historic Building Conservation. His publications include: Re:Urbanism; The Connected City; Urban Design Guidance; three design guides for the Scottish Government; and a book of his cartoons, Plandemonium. Rob began working on urban lexicography in 2000. The first edition of his acclaimed The Dictionary of Urbanism was published in 2005, and he has been updating and expanding it ever since. The second edition is due to be published in 2016. He has originated three influential urban design methods: the Placecheck method of urban design audit; the skills appraisal method Capacitycheck; and the design appraisal method Qualityreviewer. He was the founder chairman of Vision for London, a special advisor to the House of Commons ODPM Committee and the first director of the Urban Design Group. He is a Design Council CABE Built Environment Expert.

Andrew Campbell
Executive Director, Massive Small Collective

I believe that Massive Small holds the potential for a radically more democratic way of developing cities. One where people are given the means and agency to create economic opportunities for themselves.

I am privileged to lead the Massive Small inception team, a group of uniquely talented individuals with a shared vision of how we can revitalise cities. Together we aim to put in place the conditions for Massive Small to become a massively transformative force in the world.

I began to collaborate with my father, Kelvin Campbell, at the same time as encountering complexity theory, and discovering its critical importance in understanding city development. For the past five years, we have been honing the method and produced several publications.

This collaboration has led to my founding the Massive Small Collective, designed to work according to massive small principles, and to be a platform and opportunity for anyone who wants to make real change in the way their cities work.

I studied Urban Development and Landscape Architecture. Realising the importance of seeing how urban systems are grounded and fundamentally affected by, and dependent on, the larger environmental system; I went on to focus on Sustainability. I also have experience in building transformative communities. Having engaged with chapter-based and purpose-driven organisations like Net Impact and The Natural Step, I now bring this thinking to the formation of this collective.

I hope to serve the community of Massive Small to the best of my ability. If you also see the potential of this platform and would like to get in touch I would be delighted to hear from you, feel free to email me. [email protected]

 

Lauren Hermanus
Strategic Director, Massive Small Collective

I am most thrilled by the power of imagination to change the way we solve problems. Our ability to think up new futures for our cities and societies, presents us with blueprints that allows us to act differently today. This is why I am a part of the Massive Small Inception team, connecting with a global network of urbanists to imagine these new futures together.

I am a sustainable development specialist, whose role is to envision, strategise and implement interventions for an inclusive and sustainable society. I continue this work with Massive Small, drawing on my knowledge and experience of complexity thinking and development policy and practice.

My interest in small interventions with massive impact has led me to focus my most recent research (Mphil) on energy innovation. Specifically, this work speaks to how renewable energy technologies are creating space for new actors, roles and opportunity within energy systems. And further, how the consequent decentralisation of power is supporting local #resilience and economic opportunity.

BA Hons. (Politics, Philosophy, Economics), MA (Complexity and Post-structural Philosophy), MPhil (Development Policy and Practice – currently enrolled)

Dan Dubowitz
Creative Director - London, UK

Dan specialises in identifying how a new identity can be established from the very outset of an area’s development.Over the last 15 years he has pioneered a new approach to embedding cultural transformation into city- scale developments which has become known as cultural masterplanning. He led on the development, design and delivery of the cultural transformation of major urban developments, in particular:

• Gorbals, Glasgow

• Sunniside, Sunderland

• Scotswood Housing Expo, Newcastle

• Ancoats, Manchester

• Stoke On Trent

• Nine Elms, London

• Oldham Historic Town Centre and Oldham College

One of the challenges of transformation on a large scale is that it is planned centrally. Typically, the first act of any development is to lock people out, sometimes for decades. When the hoardings are finally lowered, the place is all too often devoid of life. It is early during a development rather than at completion that a programme needs to establish a cultural life and begin to shape its new identity.

Dan’s work challenges the way things are normally done. Whilst connected to and part of the area plan it immediately spins out to embrace the complexity of the town or city. He devises cultural interventions from the bottom up whilst the bigger picture emerges. Projects can be as simple as: combining social media with unearthing photo archives; a series of walks; collecting oral histories. When these cultural activities sing from the same songsheet as the area’s masterplan, they act incrementally. In this way the emerging masterplan can evolve and enable the engagement it needs to reach a critical mass of cultural life and a new identity is established in tandem with the development. This is all part of a choreography of civic projects that engage people. Through their direct experience, people begin to anticipate a new city quarter. These early interventions then become the basis for permanent projects to be embedded in the area as the development unfolds. Collectively they establish the development as a place of inspiration and intrigue.

Without this, places can fail. Continuity of culture is the catalyst for positive urban change.